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Can You Build Next to a Drain Field?

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Can You Build Next to a Drain Field?

Can You Build Next to a Drain Field?

When you are deciding whether or not to build on top of a drain field, there are some things to consider. Among other things, you will want to keep traffic and heavy equipment away from the area. Also, you should avoid adding a deck or other structure over the drain field.

This is for the person who has zero time to find a drainage specialist and fix the problem so it does not happen again at an affordable price.
Call: 07949 653019 or 07710 937750

Plants to plant on top of a septic drain

The best way to plant on top of a septic drain field is to choose plants that have shallow roots. A shallow root system means that they won't clog septic drain field pipes and will not cause damage to the underground system.

Shallow-rooted annuals and perennials are ideal for this type of soil absorption field. They don't require replanting every spring and can reduce the amount of watering needed.

Herbaceous plants are also ideal. These include turf-grass, perennials, weeds, and ground covers. Depending on the site, these plants can be planted anywhere from 10 to 20 feet away from the septic tank.

If you want to plant trees, you should only do so in very limited situations. Avoid planting cedars, as they have septic-damaging roots. Trees should be upland varieties. It is also important to consider the spread of the roots.

In addition to helping the septic system, plants help prevent erosion. By sucking up excess moisture, they also reduce the risk of flooding in the drain field.

Avoid planting vegetables

There are some plants that you should avoid planting over a septic field. If you are planting fruit trees, you should be especially careful.

Shallow rooted herbaceous plants such as flowering annuals are well suited to drain field planting. Non-native grasses and groundcovers are also a good bet.

Aside from the fact that they will help keep the soil in place, some of these plants can absorb excess moisture from the soil and help prevent erosion. Some of these nifty plants can also help prevent overwatering, which can clog up your septic system.

The septic field is also home to some deep rooted problems. For example, the root systems of some vegetables can clog your drain pipes and cause costly repairs.

To avoid this problem, be sure to use a variety of techniques. Use shallow-rooted plants to minimize root intrusion and avoid letting your soil become overly compacted. Also, consider mulching to keep the area around your septic field free from weeds.

Avoid adding a deck or other structure over a drain field

If you are planning to build a deck or other structure next to a drain field, you should be careful. You don't want to disturb the soil and cause sewage backup, which can lead to costly repairs. The best way to avoid these issues is to check the soil before building your structure.

Drain fields are typically flat, open areas covered with layers of soil and gravel. They usually contain perforated septic pipes. In order to prevent soil erosion, they should be planted with shallow-rooted herbaceous plants. These plants include grasses, weeds, and other groundcovers. Some of the types of perennials that are good for drain field planting are flowering annuals, bulbs, and mixes of wildflowers.

The grasses that you use to cover your drain field should be low-growing and non-invasive. The plants that you use must be able to grow naturally without using fertilizer. There are many species of native and non-native grasses that are well-suited for drain field planting.

This is for the person who has zero time to find a drainage specialist and fix the problem so it does not happen again at an affordable price.
Call: 07949 653019 or 07710 937750

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Drainage and waste disposal: Approved Document H - Government Publications

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